Bloomberg Law Seeks Student Representative

Here is information provided by Bloomberg Law:

Bloomberg Law is seeking an energetic and highly-motivated Product Advocate to support Bloomberg Law at George Mason University School of Law. The successful candidate will be fully trained on how to use Bloomberg Law and share their expertise with fellow students and faculty. If you are interested, please email your resume to Beth Goldfinger at


Summer Access to Legal Databases

During the Summer, GMUSL students have the following legal database access:

  • Bloomberg Law: Unlimited, unrestricted access.
  • Lexis:  Unlimited access for work (paid or unpaid) and academic purposes using a Lexis Advance ID.
  • Westlaw:  Limited access June 1-July 31.  Students retain access to all TWEN courses and materials.  Students may apply for a password extension here for the following acceptable uses: Summer law school classes, law journal work, projects for faculty, moot court, and unpaid, nonprofit public-interest internship/externship work required for graduation. Summer passwords may not be used for research for law firms, government agencies, corporations or other purposes unrelated to law school coursework.

During the Summer, students continue to have full access to all other Law-Related Databases and databases available from the GMU Libraries Database Portal.

Reference Librarians will be available throughout the Summer to answer any research-related questions.  Please feel free to call, email, or stop by the Reference Office. Full contact details are available from the library Staff Directory.


GMU Libraries Provide Access to Vault Career Insider

Career Insider by Vault provides career information and management tools including:

  • Vault Career Guides (includes legal practice areas and law firms)
  • Industry and company profiles
  • Resume and cover letter resources
  • Salary information
  • Job alerts
  • Online career forums

GMU patrons may access Career Insider using the link above or from the GMU Database Portal (listed alphabetically under “C” or “V”).  First time users are required to set up a personal username and password.



Westlaw Table Day

Westlaw is hosting a “Welcome Back” table tomorrow, January 8, 11:30 am -1:00 pm.  Students can stop by for sweets and Westlaw goodies — and  those who show a document on WestlawNext will receive 100 points and entered to win a pack of four top law movies.  Questions?  Contact our Thompson Reuters Account Manager, Annemarie Milton.

Tragedy in Norway: Breivik Sentenced

Just over a year ago, I shared information here about the tragic events in Norway and the legal process that would follow. Today the Norwegian court found Breivik sane and therefore legally responsible for killing 77 people. This decision will keep Breivik in prison for a least 21 years but likely more, as this maximum punishment under Norwegian Law may be enhanced if he is deemed a danger to society.

Interested in locating international news sources about this or other topics?  One option is a Google “news” search. GMU patrons also have access to several news databases, including NewsBank which includes several hundred international newspapers, news services and broadcast media


Training for LRWA III Students

Vendor representatives will offer optional training sessions for LRWA III students:

Bloomberg Law

  • August 20:  9:00 am, 11:00 am, 1:00 pm
  • August 21:  3:00 pm, 5:00 pm
All Bloomberg Law sessions will be held in the library training lab, Room 342.


  • August 20  noon, 5:00 pm
  • August 21 noon, 5:00 pm

Noon sessions will be held in Room 332, 5:00 sessions will be held in Room 221.


  • August 20 12:30pm, 3:00 pm
  • August 21 1:00 pm, 5:30pm

All Westlaw training sessions will be held in Room 121.

The Second Anniversary of Dodd-Frank

Tomorrow it will be two years since Congress enacted the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.  The law was designed to provide comprehensive reform to financial regulation in response to the major crisis that hit the U.S. financial system in 2008. The law’s stated purpose is:

To promote the financial stability of the United States by improving accountability and transparency in the financial system, to end ‘‘too big to fail’’, to protect the American taxpayer by ending bailouts, to protect consumers from abusive financial services practices, and for other purposes.

This voluminous statute has spawned thousands of pages of regulation. Its provisions include the establishment of the Financial Stability Oversight Council, chaired by the Treasury Secretary and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

A Congressional Research Service Report summarizing the policy issues and provisions of the law is available here.  Not surprisingly, the law has generated vocal adherents and detractors.  A Google News search for “Dodd-Frank” and/or a search limited to “Blogs”* will reveal many of these opinions.

*To find blogs on Google: Search for the desired keyword>From the results page, expand the left hand toolbar at “More”>Select “Blogs”


Happy Fourth of July!

Independence Day marks the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. But what exactly is this document?  It is printed in Statutes at Large.  It is included in the United States Code as one of “The Organic Laws of the United States of America.”  It has been mentioned periodically in Supreme Court decisions. Not surprisingly, the relevance of this document has been the subject of some debate in the legal academy. “Declaration of Independence” as a title search in HeinOnline will yield several articles.

Visit the National Archives website to view images of the Declaration of Independence and to read a brief history of this document.  The original is housed in the Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom.  You can also view a 1998 video of then members of the Supreme Court reading the complete text.

The law library will be closed on Wednesday, July 4 in observance of Independence Day.  Enjoy the fireworks!

Happy Ratification Day!

Under Article VII of the U.S. Constitution: “The Ratification of the Conventions of nine States, shall be sufficient for the Establishment of this Constitution between the States so ratifying the Same.” On June 21, 1788, New Hampshire became the ninth state to ratify the U.S. Constitution, allowing it to become the nation’s governing document.

Want to learn more about Constitutional History?  Two sources for GMUSL patrons to explore are:

HeinOnline’s Legal Classics Library:  Includes more than 2,700 works “from some of the greatest legal minds in history.” The collection focuses on constitutional law, comparative law, and political science.  Browse by  title, name, author, or subject.

The Making of Modern Law Primary Sources, 1620-1926:  Searchable digital archive that includes published records of the American colonies and state constitutional conventions.

Survey Response: Can the Library Provide Access to Pacer?

Many suggested that we provide access to PACER, the Public Access to Court Electronic Records system, so that students can download litigation documents, such as complaints and motions, in federal court cases. We do provide PACER access! Because the library pays a charge for every page downloaded, we ask you to see a Reference Librarian for assistance in using PACER for academic purposes (class, note, journal, etc.).

What’s more, though, all PACER documents are available for free to academic users through Bloomberg Law. Search Dockets on BLaw. Be sure to “Update” your docket at the top of the page. Download the document(s) you want. When the notice of PACER fees pops up, ignore it, and submit your document request. BLaw does not charge academic users to retrieve these documents. The document will arrive in your email inbox within moments.