World Intellectual Property Day 2012

Since 2000, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) has designated April 26 as “World Intellectual Property Day.”  This year’s theme is “Visionary Innovators”:

Behind every great innovation, either artistic or technological, is a human story – a tale in which new pathways open as a result of the curiosity, insight or determination of individuals.

The WIPO is an agency of the United Nations focused on “developing a balanced and accessible international intellectual property (IP) system.”  It administers a number of international treaties focused on copyright and related rights.  World Intellectual Property Day was established to increase public awareness and understanding of the significant role of IP in fostering “music, arts and entertainments” and “all the products and technological innovations that help to shape our world.”

Resources on the WIPO website include an overview (including links to PDFs) of United States IP-related statutes and regulations, and WIPO-administered treaty membership.  Please consult the law library’s Intellectual Property Research Guide to locate additional useful resources related to copyright, trademark, and patent law.

Kindle Winner Announced

Thank you to all students who participated in the Westlaw v. WestlawNext study. Your time and effort are very important to the conclusions we will draw and the scholarship we will publish about the important topic of legal research search engines and databases. We drew the Kindle winner this morning. Your chances of winning were good – 1 in 24. Keep that in mind next year when we run our next study, and please consider participating. The more participants we have, the more statistically significant our results. We don’t yet know what the next study will be, but perhaps WestlawNext v. LexisAdvance.

 

Exam Prep: Library Study Aids

Just a reminder that the law library has numerous study aids and other resources (many on reserve) that may be useful during exams. Some options include:

  • Get a broad overview: Nutshells
  • Focus on the core principles: Concise Hornbooks and Understanding Series
  • Go in-depth: Hornbook Series and Aspen Student Treatise Series
  • Test yourself: Examples & Explanations Series and Questions & Answers Series

Law and the Titanic Tragedy

One hundred years ago today, the RMS Titanic sank, tragically costing more than 1,500 people their lives.

In Custodia Legis blog has a very interesting post about this disaster from a legal perspective, specifically the then applicable laws related to lifeboats–with which the Titanic was in compliance.  Under UK shipping laws at the time, lifeboat capacity was based on ship tonnage rather than numbers of passengers.  According to a Senate Report issued after 18 days of hearings, the Titanic exceeded those requirements by having a lifeboat capacity of 1,176.  The ship had more than 2,200 passengers and crew, but fewer than a quarter of that number survived.

There were lawsuits for personal injury, wrongful death, and property damage. Claims against the ship’s owner in a U.S. courts, however, were severely limited under U.S. Admiralty Law. See Oceanic Steam Navigation Co. v. Mellor, 233 U.S. 712 (1913). Ultimately, cases filed in both the United States and England were resolved by a consolidated settlement. See Robert D. Peltz, The Titanic’s Legacy:  The History and Legal Developments Following the World’s Most Famous Maritime Disaster, 12 U.S.F. Mar. L.J. 45 (1999). 

After Robert Ballard discovered the Titanic wreckage, Congress passed the R.M.S. Titanic Memorial Act of 1986 designating the site “an international maritime memorial to the men,women, and children who perished aboard her.”

Some of the the resources available to GMUSL readers to learn more include:

In addition, the International Maritime Organization website has information on the history of the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) adopted in response to Titanic tragedy.

 

 

The Book

Once upon a time, there was no Westlaw, LexisNexis, or Bloomberg.  Checking case authority meant print digests, reporters, and Shepards.  As National Library Week comes to a close, take a moment to remember where it all began:  Birth of a Book.

It’s Opening Day in DC!

In honor of the Washington Nationals home opener and National Library Week, today’s blog entry will highlight some print titles about baseball available in the law library:

For more titles related to Sports and the Law, please consult the law library catalog.

Take Me Out to the Ball Game . . .

In honor of the start of the 2012 MLB season take a step back in baseball history by viewing the Library of Congress American Memory Project collection of digitized vintage baseball cards.  The cards, from 1887-1914,  feature notable players including:  Ty Cobb, Walter Johnson, King Kelly, Connie Mack, Christy Mathewson, Tris Speaker, Honus Wagner, and Cy Young.

The Amercian Memory Project also contains many valuable legal documents in the A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation collection from the Continental Congress, the Constitutional Convention, and United States Congress.