WHAT IS CALI ???

As we distribute CALI access codes to first years, a logical question has come up: What is CALI?

CALI stands for the Center for Computer-Assisted Legal Instruction.  It is a nonprofit consortium, established in 1982, that now includes most U.S. law schools and many other entities that are interested in legal education.

For law students, CALI is primarily a source for hundreds of concise lessons written by faculty and librarians. These online tutorials serve to introduce and/or review substantive legal topics, legal writing, legal research, and other useful subjects.

There are several introductory CALI Lessons created especially for 1Ls, including:

WELCOME STUDENTS!

The Library and Technology Staff welcomes all new and returning students to the George Mason University School of Law.  We look forward to seeing you in the library

Hours: when classes are in session, the library is open:

  • Sunday 10:00 am – 11:00 pm
  • Monday -Thursday 8:00 am – 11:00 pm
  • Friday 8:00 am – 10:00 pm
  • Saturday 10:00 am – 10:00 pm

Reference: when classes are in session, the Reference Office (on the main floor of the library) is open:

  • Monday – Thursday 9:00 am – 9:00 pm
  • Friday 9:00 am – 5:00pm
  • Sunday 2:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Feel free to contact Reference Librarians in person (no appointment needed), by phone, or send an email. Contact information is on the Staff Directory Page.

The Technology Center: is located on the 3rd floor of the Law Library in Room 362, and is generally open on weekdays from 9:00 am to 8:00 pm. Contact information is available on the Technology Support Page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Summer Hours July 5 – August 16

Summer Exams/Bar Exam: July 5 – July 27

  • Sunday 10:00 AM – 11:00 PM
  • Monday – Friday  8:00 AM – 11:00 PM
  • Saturday 9:00 AM – 10:00 PM

Bar Exam: July 28

  • Monday  8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

Summer Intersession: July 29 – August 16

  • Sunday  CLOSED
  • Monday – Saturday: 10:00 AM -6:00 PM

During Summer Intersession, the Reference Office closes at 5:00pm on weekdays.

Happy Independence Day 2014!

Independence Day marks the adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. But what exactly is this document?

The Declaration of Independence is printed in Statutes at Large.  It is included in the the United States Code as one of  “The Organic Laws of the United States of America.”  It has been mentioned periodically in Supreme Court decisions. Not surprisingly, the relevance of this document has been the subject of some debate in the legal academy. “Declaration of Independence” as a title search in HeinOnline will yield several articles.

Visit the National Archives website to view images of the Declaration of Independence and to read a brief history of this document. The original is housed in the Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom. You can also view a 1998 video of then members of the Supreme Court reading the complete text.

The law library will be closed on July 4th in observance of Independence Day. Enjoy the fireworks!

50th Anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Pub.L. 88–352, 78 Stat. 241) was signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson on July 2, 1964. The Act prohibits discrimination in public places, bans segregation in schools,and makes employment discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex or national origin illegal. It also created the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

Learn more about the Civil Rights Act:

 

Farewell to a Classic

Westlaw Classic has gone off into the sunset. . . .

Effective today, Westlaw Classic is not longer available to academic subscribers. All GMU users will have access to Westlaw Next only. TWEN and West Study Aids remain available.

Need help with the transition?

The Laws of the Game

Football (aka soccer) has been governed by written “laws” since the first British Football Assocation rules were drafted in 1863. The development and expansion of the laws later became the job of the International Football Association Board (IFAB), established in 1882, which unified the four football associations in the United Kingdom.The sport became known as “Association Football.”

In 1904 seven european countries established FIFAFédération Internationale de Football Association. Nine years later, FIFA joined the IFAB and was given a controlling vote in the new organization. The organization became the sport’s world governing body.

FIFA, now based in Zurich, is comprised of 209 member associations. Its governing bodies include a Congress, Executive Committee, and a General Secretariat.The IFAB reviews and modifies the sport’s rules annually. The current Laws of the Game have been in force since June 1, 2014.This 140-page document details the requirements for equipment, the rules of play, and guidelines for referees.

Under FIFA’s “Statutes” the organization recognizes the International Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) “to resolve disputes between FIFA, Members, Confederations, Leagues, clubs, Players, Officials and licensed match agents and players’ agents.” CAS decisions related to football may be found here.

FootballRules

 

 

 

70th Anniversary of D-Day and the Importance of a Single Patent

On June 6, 1944, more than 130,000 troops landed on the beaches of Normandy, France in a campaign called Operation Overlord. To succeed, the operation needed boats that could be landed directly on beaches without using a dock or wharf.

Higgins Industries, a New Orleans company headed by Andrew Jackson Higgins, patented and built a specially designed boat that was used for the D-Day amphibious landings. President Eisenhower later called Higgins “the man that won the war for us.”

A copy of this patent can be found using the U.S. Patent and Trade Mark Office’s Patent and Full-Text Database.The National Archives also has a special virtual exhibit  commemorating D-Day that includes a digital copy of the original patent for the Higgins Boat Landing Craft. Here is the accompanying drawing of the design:

Higgins Boat

 

 

 

 

ost 133,000 troops landed on D-Day.   hat could  transport military equipment to the beaches without the use of wharves or docks was crucial. 

Memorial Day 2014

In observance of Memorial Day, the law library will be closed Sunday, May 25 and Monday, May 26.

A brief Memorial Day History is available on the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Website. Also of interest may be two famous Memorial Day speeches delivered by Oliver Wendell Holmes, one in 1884 and the other addressed to the graduating class at Harvard Law School in 1895.  PDFs of these speeches are available using The Making of Modern Law: Legal Treatises Database (GMUSL users may link to this database here).

And where is Memorial Day officially designated a Federal holiday? Title 36 of the United States Code includes statutes relating to “Patriotic and National Observances.” 36 U.S.C. § 116 designates the last Monday in May as Memorial Day.

 

477px-Graves_at_Arlington_on_Memorial_Day