EXTENDED LAW LIBRARY HOURS DURING EXAMS

In response to student requests, the law library will be open extended hours during exams.

The Details:

Library Hours December 1 – 17 

  • Sunday  10:00 AM – 2:00 AM
  • Monday – Friday 8:00 AM –  2:00 AM
  • Saturday 9:00 AM – 11:00 PM

The Fine Print:  

  • An Arlington Campus security guard will staff the door from 11:00 pm to 2:00 am. Regular Circulation services will not be available during those hours.
  • The building will lock at the normal time of 11:00 pm. If you leave the building, you will not be able to get back in.
  • Only GMU students will be allowed to use the library after 11:00 pm.
  • You may be asked by the guard to show your GMU ID, so please be sure to have it with you.
  • Students are asked not to enter Founders after 11:00 p.m.

The guard will do regular head counts during the late evening to help us determine whether this service is being used or not.

 Best of Luck on Exams!!

GETTING READY FOR EXAMS: STUDY AIDS

The law library has numerous print study aids on reserve at the circulation desk that may be useful during exams:

  • Get a broad overview: Nutshells
  • Focus on the core principles: Concise Hornbooks and Understanding Series
  • Go in-depth: Hornbook Series and Aspen Student Treatise Series
  • Test yourself: Examples & Explanations Series and Questions & Answers Series
  • Study on the Go: Gilbert Law School Legends Audio Series and Sum & Substance CDs. (Available titles are listed here)

Many of these titles and more are also available to students by accessing our West Study Aids Subscription.

HAPPY THANKSGIVING!

On Thursday, November 26, 1789, the first Thanksgiving holiday was celebrated pursuant to a proclamation issued by President George Washington. A 1863 proclamation by President Abraham Lincoln established the last Thursday of November as the regular date for this celebration.

That tradition continued until 1939, when President Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaimed the holiday would be celebrated on the second to last Thursday of November that year (November 23, 1939). Roosevelt was responding to pressure from retailers to expand the Christmas shopping season.This change sparked controversy and angered some football coaches, whose season was scheduled according to the holiday. There was also a  a split among states, 32 issuing proclamations following the President but 16 others refusing to change the date.  See H.R. Rep. No.77-1186, at 1 (1941) (available to GMU patrons on Proquest Congressional)

Two years later, on December 26, 1941, President Roosevelt signed a joint congressional resolution, known as the Thanksgiving Day Act (55 Stat. 862) establishing Thanksgiving as a Federal holiday on the fourth Thursday of November.

In observance of the Thanksgiving Holiday, the law library will have reduced hours:

  • Wed. Nov. 26  9:00 am – 5:00 pm, References Services 9:00 am -12:00 pm
  • Thurs. Nov. 27 Closed
  • Fri. Nov. 28  Closed
  • Sat. Nov. 29  noon - 6:00 pm
  • Sun. Nov. 30  10:00 am -11:00 pm, Reference Services 2:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Have a safe and enjoyable holiday!

VETERANS DAY

Pursuant to 5 USC § 6103, Veterans Day is November 11 each year.

GMUSL has a special commitment to serving our country’s veterans. Since 2004, the law school has provided a Clinic for Legal Assistance to Servicemembers and Veterans (CLASV):

The clinic enables Mason law students to represent servicemembers and veterans in a wide variety of litigation and non-litigation matters. Since its inception, clinic students have assisted over 70 clients from all five branches of the armed services, in litigation, adjudication and negotiation regarding consumer protection, administrative and military law and entitlements (TSGLI, PEB Boards and discharge upgrade appeals), family law, bankruptcy, immigration, landlord-tenant, contract, estate and entitlement matters in federal and state forums.

Students interested in CLASV will find additional information here. For more information about Veterans Day, please see the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Website.

 

NATIVE AMERICAN LAW

November is National American Indian Heritage Month, in recognition of the “significant contributions the first Americans made to the establishment and growth of the United States.” The Law Library of Congress has a helpful guide summarizing the legislative history of this celebration available here.

Please consult these resources for information about Native American/American Indian Law :

LAW AND ALL HALLOWS’ EVE

Halloween can be a catalyst for unique lawsuits.  A 2011 article in the New York State Bar Association Journal, titled Case Law from the Crypt: The Law of Halloween summarizes some of these strange cases.

In one case, the plaintiff alleged that a neighbor’s holiday decorations—which included an “‘Insane Asylum’ directional sign pointed towards the plaintiff’s house” and a tombstone referencing the plaintiff— were “defamatory, harassing, and caused emotional distress.” In addition to claims involving Halloween decorations, other cases have involved injury to persons or property and provocative costumes in the workplace.

In her book, Halloween Law, Law Professor Victoria Sutton calls Justice Scalia the “father of Halloween Law.”  During oral argument in Central Virginia Community College v. Katz, 546 U.S. 356 (2006), held on October 31, 2005, a light bulb exploded loudly.  This led to the following exchange:

Justice Scalia: Light bulb went out.

Chief Justice Roberts: It’s a trick they play on new justices all the time.

Justice Scalia:  Happy Halloween.

Justice Ginsburg:  That’s the idea

Justice Roberts:  Take your time.

Justice Scalia:  We’re even more in the dark now than before.

Listen to the Oral Argument on Oyez.org here (explosion at 42:59).

Happy Halloween!!

 

OYEZ, OYEZ, OYEZ: IT’S THE FIRST MONDAY IN OCTOBER

Since 1916, the Supreme Court’s Term has begun each year on the first Monday in October. 28 U.S.C. § 2.  Supreme Court terms are therefore called the “October Term” followed by the year (e.g. October Term 2013). Why the first October Monday?

Under the Judiciary Act of 1789 (1 Stat. 73) the Court sat for two sessions, one beginning the “first Monday of August,” the second the “first Monday of February.” Congress subsequently altered the Court’s term a number of times:

  • 1801   Two Terms, began the first Mondays in June and December (2 Stat.89)
  • 1802   One Term, began the first Monday in February (2 Stat.156)
  • 1826   One Term, began the second Monday in January (4 Stat.160)
  • 1844   One Term, began the second Monday in December (5 Stat.676)
  • 1873   One Term, began the second Monday of October (17 Stat.419)

In 1916, Congress passed H.R. 15158 (39 Stat. 726) which amended the judicial code to, in part, fix the start of the Court’s term to the first Monday in October. According to both the applicable House and Senate Committee Reports, the purpose of changing the term start date was “to shorten the vacation and give the court an extra week when the weather is favorable to work.” H. R. Rep. No. 794 at 1 (1916), S. Rep. No. 775 at 1 (1916).

For more information about the Court’s docket, including oral argument dates, consult the Supreme Court WebsiteScotusblog is another very useful source to keep up to date on cases before the Court.